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Bird Details

Perching Perching

Western Tanager

Piranga ludoviciana

Western Tanager
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 7 in. (18 cm)
Usually high in dense conifer trees, this tanager can be hard to see on its breeding grounds. During migration through riparian areas and more open forest, it often moves in large but loose flocks. The nest is located high in a conifer out near the tip of a horizontal branch and made of twigs, moss and hair. Food is mainly insects and a few buds in the summer and fruits in the winter. The four-digit banding code is WETA.

Fir forest
Fir forest

Oak-pine woodland
Oak-pine woodland

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Urban city
Urban city

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

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Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call
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Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_WETA_1_050501_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_WETA_3_042002_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.