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Bird Details

Sandpiper Like Sandpiper Like

Black-necked Stilt

Himantopus mexicanus

Black-necked Stilt
copyright Herbert Clarke
Length: 14 in. (36 cm)
Found wading in marshes, wet mud and flooded fields, the Black-necked Stilt usually occurs in small colonies. It nests on the ground on little islands or hummocks in wet areas, and the shallow nest is lined with pebbles, sticks and clam shells. Adults vigorously protect nest sites by calling loudly and flying close over the head of intruders. They will also fake a wing injury to draw the enemy away from the eggs or young. Food is picked from under water and consists of invertebrates, small fish, tadpoles and occasionally seeds. This species is considered threatened in Hawaii. The four-digit banding code is BNST.
black_necked_stilt.jpg

Male
copyright Herbert Clarke

Mudflat
Mudflat

Open water
Open water

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call
Download sound

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Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_BNST_3_042003_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_BNST_4_062704_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.