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Bird Details

Perching Perching

Loggerhead Shrike

Lanius ludovicianus

Loggerhead Shrike
copyright Herbert Clarke
Length: 9 in. (23 cm)
Obvious as it perches high in the top of a tree, bush, or telephone wire in open country, the Loggerhead Shrike is constantly looking for prey, such as large insects, mice, lizards and occasionally small birds. When prey is sighted running on the ground, the shrike swoops down and dispatches it with its hooked bill. In times of prey abundance, the shrike will impale extra food items on spines of bushes or on sharp points of barbed wire, sometime accumulating many dead carcasses all hanging as in a butcher shop. This behavior is the origin of the other common name of the shrike, the butcher bird. Its bulky nest is woven of twigs and hair and hidden in a dense patch of shrubbery or small tree. The four-digit banding code is LOSH.
loggerhead_shrike.jpg

Male
copyright Herbert Clarke

Desert
Desert

Grasslands
Grasslands

Shrubs
Shrubs

Agricultural
Agricultural

Savanna
Savanna

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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_LOSH_1_120201_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_LOSH_2_011302_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.