School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Ask A Biologist heading

Bird Details

Perching Perching

Dark-eyed Junco

Junco hyemalis

Dark-eyed Junco
copyright Oliver Niehuis
Length: 5 in. (16 cm)
Calculated to be the second most common land bird in North America, during the winter the Dark-eyed Junco is readily seen. It usually travels in small flocks and associates with other species of small birds. It is also a frequent visitor to seed feeders. During the summer pairs occupy territories in open coniferous and deciduous forest. Its nest is in a protected depression on the forest floor and lined with grass, moss and twigs. The young are fed insects. Several distinctive color forms nest in different parts of North America, but in the winter, junco flocks can often have representatives of several geographic forms together. The four-digit banding code is DEJU.
dark_eyed_gray_headed_junco_niehuis.jpg

Male
copyright Oliver Niehuis

Fir forest
Fir forest

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Shrubs
Shrubs

Agricultural
Agricultural

Savanna
Savanna

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Call
Download sound

view small images | view large images | view zoomed images

CR_DEJU_3_040806_S.jpg
Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Song

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

CR_DEJU_061904_S.jpg
Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Call

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.