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Bird Details

Pigeon Like Pigeon Like

Gambel's Quail

Callipepla gambelii

Gambel's Quail
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 10 in. (25 cm)
In hot dry deserts, coveys of this quail are common, even entering suburban areas in search of water and food. It feeds on plant shoots, seeds, fruits and occasionally insects. During the hottest part of mid day they frequently rest in the shade or perch in a low bush. The nest is a shallow depression in the soil and lined with leaves and other vegetation. The four-digit banding code is GAMQ.

Desert
Desert

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Shrubs
Shrubs

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_GAMQUAIL_1_022401_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_GAMQUAIL_2_021702_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.