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Bird Details

Perching Perching

Northern Mockingbird

Mimus polyglottos

Northern Mockingbird
copyright Richard Ditch
Length: 10 in. (25 cm)
Occurring in many types of open habitats, this species is as familiar in arid deserts as it is in suburbs and city centers. It is best known for its remarkable ability to mimic other birds' songs as well as mechanical noises, such as whistles, cars and trains. The Mockingbird often flashes the big white patches in its wings and tail to intimidate rivals and cats. It aggressively defends its nest, even from unwary humans, by dive bombing perceived intruders. Unmated males sing all though the night in the Spring. It eats insects, invertebrates and fruits, and the nest is a cup-shaped construction placed in dense tangles or shrubbery. The four-digit banding code is NOMO.

Chaparral
Chaparral

Desert
Desert

Shrubs
Shrubs

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

Savanna
Savanna

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
Download sound

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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_NOMO_1_031001_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_NOMO_2_051501_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.