School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Ask A Biologist heading

Bird Details

Parrots Parrots

Rosy-faced Lovebird

Agapornis roseicollis

Rosy-faced Lovebird
copyright Charles Kazilek
Length: 6 in. (16 cm)
This tiny parrot is native to the deserts of south-western Africa where it frequents dry woodlands, riparian areas, cultivated fields and vegetation along standing water. It has adaptations for enduring cold winters and hot summers. It feeds mainly on grass seeds and nests in rock crevices and other shallow cavities. This species has the peculiar habit of transporting nesting material tucked into the rump feathers. A common cage bird, it apparently was released accidentally in central Arizona in the mid-1990s. Unlike many caged birds, this parrot was already adapted to the climate and weather of central Arizona, which is very similar to its native habitat in Africa. The Rosy-faced Lovebird has expanded its population throughout the Phoenix valley and even as far south as Tucson. It nests commonly in urban areas, where water, food and nesting cavities are readily available.
Rosy-faced-Lovebird-kazilek.jpg

Male
copyright Charles Kazilek

peach_faced_lovebird_niehuis.jpg

Male
copyright Oliver Niehuis

Rosy-faced-Lovebirds-kazilek.jpg

Male
copyright Charles Kazilek

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

view small images | view large images | view zoomed images

There are no sonograms saved for this bird.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.