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Bird Details

Perching Perching

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Savannah Sparrow
copyright Jim Burns
Length: 6 in. (14 cm)
Almost entirely limited to grassy meadows, marsh edges, and prairie areas, this sparrow is most easily seen perching on a tall grass or on a barbed wire fence. The grassy nest is concealed on the ground usually under overhanging grasses. During the summer, spiders and insects are added to the seed diet. In the winter, the Savannah Sparrow often occurs together with several other species of sparrows in scattered flocks in grassy areas. Populations breeding in different parts of the continent have varying amounts of yellow over the eye, and the bill size is much larger in some populations than others. In the winter many of these different appearing populations flock together in a confusing array. The four-digit banding code is SAVS.

Grasslands
Grasslands

Agricultural
Agricultural

Savanna
Savanna

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song
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Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song
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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.