School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bird Details

Perching Perching

Evening Grosbeak

Coccothraustes vespertinus

Evening Grosbeak
copyright Jim Burns
Length: 8 in. (20 cm)
A species primarily of coniferous or mixed coniferous forests at higher altitudes and latitudes, during some winters it erupts into lower elevations and farther south than normal. It can be common at winter seed feeders, but it also commonly is attracted to road salt used to melt ice. During the summer it supplements it seed diet with insects. The small nest of twigs is placed high in a tree far out on a horizontal branch. The four-digit banding code is EVGR.

Fir forest
Fir forest

Oak-pine woodland
Oak-pine woodland

There are no audio files saved for this bird.

There are no sonograms saved for this bird.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.