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Bird Details

Upright Perching Water Birds Upright Perching Water Birds

Neotropic Cormorant

Phalacrocorax brasilianus

Neotropic Cormorant
copyright Herbert Clarke
Length: 25 in. (63 cm)
Restricted to rivers, lakes, large ponds and the sea coast, this cormorant is usually most apparent sitting on a snag low over the water with its wings extended to dry. It occurs in small flocks and is often associated with the larger Double-crested Cormorant. In flight flocks of these two species fly in "V" formations with the smaller Neotropic Cormorant obvious. They feed underwater on fish, frogs and insects and often swim and feed in small groups together. The nest is a bulky platform of sticks placed in low trees and usually in colonies with other cormorants and herons. The four-digit banding code is NECO.
neotropic_cormorant.jpg

Male
copyright Herbert Clarke

Open water
Open water

Urban city
Urban city

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_NECO_121403_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Call

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.