School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bird Details

Duck Like Duck Like

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Canada Goose
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 25 in. (64 cm)
The most widely encountered goose in North America, the Canada Goose is often found in urban parks, golf course lawns, lakes and rivers. They feed on grass shoots, berries, crustaceans and in the winter largely on seeds. This species often becomes semi-domesticated and non-migratory where food and protection from predators are readily available. In the wild, its huge nest of grass, sticks is lined with feather down and placed on the ground near water. Pairs mate for many years and can be very aggressive in defense of the nest and young. For many people, flocks migrating north or south high over head in "V" formations are a signal of the passing of seasons. The four-digit banding code is CAGO.

Aerial
Aerial

Open water
Open water

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

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Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_CAGO_2_111905_S.jpg
Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song

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CR_CAGO_112504_S.jpg
Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Call

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.