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Bird Details

Perching Perching

Great-tailed Grackle

Quiscalus mexicanus

Great-tailed Grackle
copyright Richard Ditch
Length: 18 in. (46 cm)
Always associated with moist areas, this grackle has taken advantage of human water use, such as canals, golf courses and reservoirs, to dramatically spread its geographical range in the last 25 years. It is abundant in suburbs and city centers, and during the winter, it forms immense flocks that roost together in the same few trees every night. It feeds on the ground on insects, aquatic invertebrates, fruit, grain and often robs other birds' nests of their eggs and young. The Great-tailed Grackle twig nests are concentrated in loose colonies of thousands in trees near water. The four-digit banding code is GTGR.

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Song
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Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_GTGR_031701_S.jpg
Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Song

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CR_GTGR_2_030603_S.jpg
Male
Twittering (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.