School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bird Details

Hummingbird Hummingbird

Anna's Hummingbird

Calypte anna

Anna's Hummingbird
copyright Barb Winterfield
Length: 4 in. (10 cm)
The most common urban hummingbird in the far west, the Anna's Hummingbird has considerably expanded its range north and east in the last 25 years, mainly because of the availability of exotic flowers, eucalyptus trees and year round hummingbird feeders. The male is often first noticed by its squeaky song. It breeds 2 or 3 times a year and begins its first nest in December in the desert southwest. The tiny nest is held together by spider webbing and is usually at eye level in a thick bush or vine. The four-digit banding code is ANHU.
annas_hummingbird.jpg

Male
copyright Barb Winterfield

Chaparral
Chaparral

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Shrubs
Shrubs

Urban city
Urban city

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

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Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

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Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song
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CR_ANHU_1_112202_S.jpg
Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song

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CR_ANHU_3_080402_S.jpg
Male
Trilling (sound type)
Bird Song

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.