School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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Scientists are learning new things every day. They are also writing about their discoveries. In most cases they publish in science magazines called journals like the Public Library of Science (PLOS). In our PLOSable section you will find stories that will help you read and explore the articles written by scientists.

Now jump in and start exploring PLOSable - a place where firsthand science is only a mouse click away. If you're interested in diving even further into the world of the scientific article, check out our Anatomy of an Article story.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB)

One-Two Punch for Tuberculosis

By Shima Shiehzadegan

Tuberculosis (TB) can be a lethal infection that affects your lungs and can make breathing difficult. Here, scientists investigated how a new TB drug, called bedaquiline (BDQ), works in the body, and which combination of medications helps BDQ work better. 

Hand Palm

Organ Swap

By Lindsey O'Connell

A transplant is what happens when doctors take a body part from one person and give it to another person, kind of like Frankenstein except not so scary-looking. Scientists are hard at work on some of the most difficult parts to transplant like hands and faces.

Our Bodies, the Tumor Feeders

By Alexis Abboud

When a tumor grows in a human body, you'd think that the body would fight it every way possible. But our bodies build vessels that deliver blood to tumors, helping them to grow. Scientists are trying to figure out why this happens so they can stop our bodies from feeding tumors. 

A neanderthal skull has been partially uncovered from it's resting place, a mix

Proof is in the Poop

By Han Duerstock

Most people believed that Neanderthals, a species related to humans, were hunters that only ate meat. By taking a look at the Neanderthal’s fossilized poop, scientists discovered that there was more to their diet than just meat.

a cartoon notebook is shown with a large pencil sitting on top. The paper is bei

Ranked and Ready: The Most Important Diseases To Study

By Megan Berry

Are we armed with all the information to fight the worst diseases, even the ones that we’ve just discovered? Scientists wanted to create a list to identify the worst diseases to gain more information and be ready to help treat these diseases. 

Rare Species Work Hard

By Natasha Coult

There are different ecosystems all around the world. All of these ecosystems are supported by the animals, plants, and other things living there. Researchers are learning that even the very rare species are important for an ecosystem to survive. 

Robot Mutant

Robo-Mutants!

By Craig Trevor Johnson

Mutant robots with six arms and a mind of their own are stuff of science ficiton, right? Scientists are challenging that idea by creating robo-mutants in the lab and seeing how they evolve.

Science of Teamwork

By Viviane Callier

Scientists study the science of basketball teamwork and how different networks can make the difference between winning and losing.

a honeybee flies close to a vibrant pink flower.

Shimmery Defense

By Melinda Weaver

Many animals, including humans, build homes to live in. But when you have a home, you often need to work hard to defend it. In this article scientists discovered a peaceful defense mechanism that giant honeybees use to fend off predators and protect their homes.

Sleeping Secret Behind Bullying Behavior

By Bethany Vu

Could more sleep make fewer bullies? Scientists have learned that there may be a link between sleep, technology, and bullying behavior.

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Anyone can use PLOS and PLOS Biology. You do not have to pay to read articles online or to download and print them. With PLOS and PLOS Biology you have first-hand access to the latest science.

Want to write a PLOSable story? Take a look at our Notes to Authors & Artists.

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

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PLoS Biology Banner

Anyone can use PLOS and PLOS Biology. You do not have to pay to read articles online or to download and print them. With PLOS and PLOS Biology you have first-hand access to the latest science.

Want to write a PLOSable story? Take a look at our Notes to Authors & Artists.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.