School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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World of Biology

Read about research projects being conducted at Arizona State University. Many of the articles you find on this page are written by graduate students in the life sciences departments. The list is always growing so be sure to come back and visit often.

Trailing through Taiga

By Sisi Gao

The taiga, or boreal forest, is the largest land biome in the world. It is deep and dark, often green, and always cold. But even in this frigid place, many animals and plants thrive.

Trekking through Tundra

By Melanie Sturm

The tundra is a cold and windy habitat, making survival a challenge. But you may be surprised by how much life there is in the tundra.

Also in: Español | Français

True Bug thumbnail

True Bugs

By Page Baluch and Adam Dolezal

Not all insects are bugs, but all bugs are insects. How can this be? Learn about some particular insects that biologists call true bugs.
Also in: Español

Using Animals in Research

By Patrick McGurrin and Christian Ross

Animals are often used to study many different scientific topics. But many scientists and others argue whether it's ok to use animals for this purpose. Here we discuss why scientists use animals and research, and discuss some of the rules and regulations in place to help protect animals used in research.

Using the Scientific Method to Solve Mysteries

By CJ Kazilek and David Pearson

If you do some experiments to see if your answer is correct and write down what you learn in a report, you have pretty much completed everything a scientist might do in a laboratory or out in the field when doing research. In fact, the scientific method works well for many things that don’t usually seem so scientific.

Link to Virtual Biomes

Virtual Biomes

By Charles Kazilek

Here you can do more than read out biomes. You can explore them in 360 degree tours. While not the same as being there in person, these tours let you go to places you would not likely be able to see.

A Walk in the Park

Walk in the Park

By Elizabeth Smith, Justin Olson, and Dr. Biology

What might look like a lifeless world is actually filled with life and history. You just need to know where to look. Take a tour with two park rangers to get the inside story of South Mountain Park.

wastewater thumb

Wastewater: Nature's Power Drink?

By Roy Marler

Within Arizona, several cities now release wastewater into riverbeds, essentially creating "new" rivers. Is wastewater different from water found in naturally occurring rivers, such as the Verde River?

What is Evolutionary Medicine?

What is Evolutionary Medicine?

By Karla Moeller

Understanding evolution doesn't just help us figure out how humans evolved...it also helps us understand why we have the health problems we do in today's society. Evolutionary medicine can help us understand our health, why we get sick, and how we can better prevent and treat disease.

All about biologists

What's a Biologist?

By Patrick McGurrin

We hear about biologists studying everything from tiny organisms to whole ecosystems. But how can the role of a biologist be so broad? Let's take a closer look at what biologists do and how you can become a biologist.

Red-eyed tree frog

The living world is limited only by what you want to explore. Jump into some of these stories to see what other biologist have been doing.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

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Red-eyed tree frog

The living world is limited only by what you want to explore. Jump into some of these stories to see what other biologist have been doing.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.