School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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March Mystery Image

1998 March Mystery image

March Mystery Image
(Photo by Jim Swafford)

This is a scanning electron micrograph of sweat on a human index finger tip. The ridges are what form our finger prints. Technically it is a replica made from the tip of an index finger. The replica is then placed inside a scanning electron microscope. We try to avoid cutting off fingers, even if it is for science! 


Congratulations to Eric, Tony and Philip from Squaw Peak for guessing the image. Hey, did you guys work on this as a group?

For those of you that are curious, here are some numbers from our list of guesses. 

  • 32% guessed that the image was something to do with skin.
  • 14% guessed that it was either pores or dirty skin.
  • 11% guessed that the image was either desert or desert with cacti.
  • 7% guessed that it was either bacteria or viruses.
  • 5% guessed that it was either a tongue or taste buds.
  • 5% guessed that it was an image from Mars.

 Some of the creative single answers are listed below.

  • Alien tribe as found on Mars.
  • Butterfly eggs on a leaf.
  • Wart's on a witch's nose.
  • Graveyard.
  • Acid inside your stomach.
  • Sea floor.
  • Goose bumps.
  • Tadpole eggs.
  • Toad skin.

 

ant, photo by Alex Wild

It's like having your own microscope! Visit our Zoom Gallery to explore and have fun zooming in and moving around each image.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

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ant, photo by Alex Wild

It's like having your own microscope! Visit our Zoom Gallery to explore and have fun zooming in and moving around each image.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.