School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

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From: November 27, 2017 at 00 hours
To: November 29, 2017 at 03 hours

From: November 27, 2017 at 00 hours
To: November 29, 2017 at 03 hours


Ask A Biologist Logo

Link: https://dev-aab-webspark.ws.asu.edu/

From: November 22, 2017 at 15 hours
To: December 15, 2017 at 16 hours

From: November 22, 2017 at 15 hours
To: December 15, 2017 at 16 hours

Digging Deeper: Stress and Gestation

Evolutionary medicine PLOSable PLUS

Digging Deeper: Stress and Gestation

Digging Deeper

Research is hard work. Researchers may spend months, years, or even decades collecting data. Sometimes when researchers analyze that data and try to present it in a handful of published pages, it can be difficult to include every single thing they did, or to discuss all the problems they encountered in the experiment or study.

Hacking Nature

Hacking is a word that is often tied to something bad. However, there are times when hacking can be for something good. Think of it as a tool that can be put to use for good or bad. We also think of hacking as something only done with computers, but can we hack other things? Dr. Biology sits down with scientist Klaus Lackner to talk about how he is hacking the environment in order to pull carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the air. If he succeeds, it could help reduce CO2 in atmosphere and redirect it towards better uses.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 17MB

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Topic Time
Why is having too much CO2 in the atmosphere bad? 01:46
Where is the extra CO2 coming from? 05:32
Have we increased the amount of CO2 in the atmospher? 07:00
You are working on a way to pull CO2 out of the atmosphere. 08:14
How can we get CO2 back out of the air? 11:25
Fuels, plastics, and algea. 17:38
It this all works do we need to worry about carbon emmission? 19:13
Its like a giant train that is difficult to slow down and stop. 22:14
Is ther something a person can do to help? [slowing down the train] 23:28
How to get the CO2 already in the atmosphere. 25:37
The detials of balance [atmosphere, biosphere, and ocean] 26:46
How are you pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere? 28:12
Three questions 30:38
When did you know you wanted to be a scientist? 30:46
What would you be if you could not be a scientist? 31:08
Advice for someone wanting to become a scientist. 32:07
Thank you 33:37
Sign-off [Center for Negative Carbon Emission] 33:45

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Hacking Nature

Audio editor: CJ Kazilek

Drawn to Bones

Television portrays the lives and work of forensic artists, but what is it like to really be a forensic artist? Are the tools you see on the big and little screen really used by the people who recreate the face of someone when there might only be a skull or parts of a scull to use as a starting point? Dr. Biology visits with forensic artist and author Catyana Falsetti to learn the answers to these questions and a lot more.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 15MB

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Topic Time
What is forensic art and the silent epidemic? 01:24
What started you on the path to be a forensic artist? 03:48
How long have you been a forensic artist? 06:30
What is it that gets you up in the morning? 07:11
If you have DNA, why do we need forensic artists?  08:14
What are some of the tools you use? 10:03
Tissue Depth Measurements 11:33
More on tools of the trade - digital tools 13:45
What is your preferred tool? 15:13
Do you use color in your work? 15:46
Is there a reason to avoid color? 16:35
What are the most common traits of a human head? 18:05
How do you know their skin color? 20:03
Does the skull indicate symmetry? 20:37
How long does it take to do a reconstruction? 22:09
Bones counterpart - Angela 23:01
Three questions 25:10
When did you know you wanted to be a forensic artist? 25:24
What would you be if you were not a forensic artist? 26:21
Advice for someone wanting to be a forensic artist. 28:16
Sign-off 29:01

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Drawn to Bones

Audio editor: CJ Kazilek

Seeing DNA

Want to see the tiny instruction set for all living things? Here is an activity that you can do at home or school that will actually let you see DNA.

>> Full Story

Monster DNA

In the tiny world of DNA, we might call genomes monsters. These huge sets of information include all the codes for all the genes present in an organism. From genomes, we can learn about the traits, diseases, and evolution of a species, and that’s just a start. What might such a monster set of data do for us if it was about our very own North American monster – the Gila monster? Computational biologist Melissa Wilson Sayres tells Dr. Biology about the Gila monster, the life-saving venom in its saliva, and what we might learn from the monster genome.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 15MB

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Topic Time
Introduction [DNA Day] 00:00
What is a genome? 01:23
When was the human genome sequence completed? 03:27
The Monster DNA project. 03:54
What is a Gila monster? 04:35
Gila monster genome and the Animal Superpower Challenge. 06:19
Why are we interested in the genome of a Gila monster? 08:15
Gila monster spit. 08:58
Gila monster unique features. 10:43
Loss of Gila monster habitat.. 11:27
The problem with relocating Gila monsters 11:57
How much and often do Gila monsters eat and drink? 13:16
The unusual thing about the Gila monster sex chromosomes 15:01
What do you do with the genome information? 16:53
Who would use information from the Gila monster genome? 18:19
DNA is amazingly efficient for storing information. 18:38
Who is involved with reading the genome? 19:06
What do you do with 400 million tiny pieces of DNA in it? 20:20
The undergraduate researcher. 20:52
Three Questions. 22:14
When did you first know you wanted to be a biologist? 22:23
Did you always like math? 25:12
What would you do if you could not be biologist? 26:44
Advice for future biologists. 28:34
Sign-off.
[learn/play - DNA Basics - Decode a Monster Genome - DNA Day]
30:23

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Monster DNA

Audio editor: CJ Kazilek

Ocean Winds and Climate

Did you know the westerly winds in the Southern Ocean have been helping to keep our planet livable? Yes, they have been responsible for soaking up half of the human-made carbon dioxide (CO2) along with a whole lot of excess heat. Dr. Biology has the opportunity to talk with geoscientist Joellen Russell about the research she and a group of scientists have been doing in the southern hemisphere that tells us how important these winds and the oceans are for regulating the temperature of the planet.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 15MB

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Topic Time
Introduction 00:00
A brief introduction of climate versus weather. 00:56
How the westerly winds of the southern hemisphere impact climate. 03:52
What does the ocean store and where? 06:21
What would happen if we put the heat stored in the oceans in the atmosphere? 06:33
How the Antarctic helps Arizona keep its cool. 07:12
Do the oceans have an unlimited capacity to absorb CO2? 09:10
Will oceans keep slowing the rate of global warming? 09:43
Adjusting computer models as we learn more to make them more accurate. 12:06
ERBE (Earth Radiation Budget Experiment) satellite. 14:48
The story of the tropics and weather. [Hadley Cells] 16:07
Hadley Cells and their effect on the tropics and deserts. 18:33
The plumbing of our atmosphere. 18:51
How oceanographers can live and the desert and still study the oceans. 19:34
Looking into the future using climate models. 22:05
Testing computer models by going back in time. 23:20
Three Questions. 23:04
When did you first know you wanted to be a scientist? 24:37
What would you do if you could not be scientist? 26:09
Advice for future scientists. 27:23
Sign-off. [learn more - SOCCOM] 29:19

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Ocean Winds and Climate

Audio editor: CJ Kazilek

An optical illusion occurs when you the way you see something is different from what the object really is. Optical illusions occur when there is an error in how the brain interprets what the eyes are seeing. In general, there are 3 types of optical illusions.

Question From: Charlie
Grade Level: 10

Answered By: Abigail Howell
Expert’s Title:
Undergraduate student, Biomedical Sciences

Have a different answer or more to add to this one? Send it to us.

Beetle Dissection

Color Online: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Ask A Biologist, Coloring Page, Beetle Dissection

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