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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Pollen - Nature's Tiny Clues

An interview with palynologist Vaughn Bryant from Texas A&M. Listen in as Dr. Biology learns how pollen is providing clues for more than scientists.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 13MB

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Topic Time
Intro - (companion web article with cool pollen gallery) 00:00
What is palynology? 01:49
What is pollen? 02:20
Pollen can travel by wind or insects. 02:51
How far can pollen travel by wind? 03:29
Shapes of pollen that travel by wind. [Mickey Mouse ear] 03:59
Do all plants use pollen for fertilization? 04:28
Pollen anatomy 05:17
How is pollen used in crime scene investigation (CSI)? [pollen print] 06:48
Import CSI case in Hungary. 08:03
Do you have to testify in courtroom cases? 09:40
Special clothing for collecting pollen in the field. 10:12
How much pollen is found in the air and how much do we breath in each day? 11:26
Why are allergies sometimes called hay fever? 12:18
Pollen and honey - what do they have in common? 13:05
Is pollen used to be sure I am getting the type of honey I paid for? 15:19
Pollen and oil and gas exploration. 16:20
Pollen and anthropology and underwater archeology. 17:20
What is it about pollen that makes us sneeze? 19:10
When did you first know you wanted to be a scientist? 20:50
What would you do or be if you were not a scientist? 23:05
Farming and genetics - Mendel. 23:41
What advice do you have for someone wanting to be a biologist? 25:21
Sign-off 26:33

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Pollen - Nature's Tiny Clues

Audio editor: Charles Kazilek

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.