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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Tiny Matter

An interview with physicist and nanobiologist Stuart Lindsay, professor in the departments of Chemistry and Physics at Arizona State University. Dr. Lindsay is also the Director of the Center for Single Molecule Biophysics at the Biodesign Institute at ASU.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 12MB

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Topic Time
Introduction - scale activity - link to scale activity math 00:00
What does the nano world look like? 04:46
Early pioneer with Atomic Force Microscopes - what is an AFM? 06:07
What are some of the other instruments used to see the nano world? 07:37
How do nano objects behave differently than larger objects? 08:22
How long did it take and how much did it cost to sequence the human genome? 10:37
Your research is working on ways to reduce the time and lower the cost of sequencing the human genome - what can we expect in the future? 11:06
How long is the human genome? 11:39
What are the pros and cons of being able to sequence the human genome quickly and at a relatively low cost? 13:06
Medical treatment benefits- 14:33
The future of nanobiology. 16:10
A computer the size of you fingernail. 18:04
Where do you begin if you want to be a nanobiologist? 18:57
When did you first know you wanted to be a scientist? 20:28
If you were not a scientists, what would you be? 21:08
Interesting hobby. 22:32
What advice do you have for young scientists? 22:50

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Tiny Matter

Audio editor: Charles Kazilek

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.