School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Watching Grass Grow

Not what you might think - the study of some grasses might unlock some important understanding to many areas of science including treatments for cancer. Dr.Biology talk with Stan Faeth, Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University and learns what secrets grasses hold.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 12MB

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Topic Time
Show - intro, grasses, ecosystems, and Sleepy Grass. 00:00
Ecosystem - species - microscopic world - fungi. 02:07
Fungus - fungi 03:31
How did you discover the fungus in these grasses? 0424
Chemical compounds - alkaloids - strychnine - nicotine, mescaline. 05:10
Anti-cancer compounds unique to these fungi. 05:38
Definition of endophytes. 06:32
Description of research field site. 07:03
Faeth explains the experiment and some basic experimental design. 07:37
Herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. 08:23
Faeth continues to explain the experimental design and how they control water. 08:41
How long have you been doing this research as an ecologist. 11:20
Faeth perspective on his type of ecological research. 12:13
Symbiotic relationships - mutualism - parasites. 13:03
What are the symbionts of the grasses? [microizee] 14:41
What are the fungal endophytes helping the plants to do? 15:23
Importance of all living things in a food web - large and small. 16:18
How did Sleepy Grass get its nickname? [LSD, Narcotic Effects} 17:39
What would happen if humans eat this grass? [Native American legend] 19:22
When did you first realize you wanted to be biologist or scientist? 21:10
What would you be if you were not a biologist or scientist? 21:28
What advice do you have for someone wanted to be a scientist/biologist? 22:15

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Watching Grass Grow

Audio editor: Charles Kazilek

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.