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Bird Details

Sandpiper Like Sandpiper Like

Greater Yellowlegs

Tringa melanoleuca

Greater Yellowlegs
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 14 in. (36 cm)
This stately shorebird passes the winter in small flocks foraging in shallow fresh, brackish or salt water mudflats. They pick small fish, insects, snails worms and other small animals from the water or surface of the mud. They winter as far south as southern Argentina. On their breeding grounds along coniferous forest ponds, their nests are depression in the moss usually protected by a log or low tree bough. The four-digit banding code is GRYE.

Mudflat
Mudflat

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_GRYE_2_120504_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_GRYE_CALLS_031804_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.