School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Ask A Biologist graphic

Bird Details

Long Legged Waders Long Legged Waders

Sandhill Crane

Grus canadensis

Sandhill Crane
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 48 in. (122 cm)
Wintering in small to immense numbers in shallow wetlands, this crane is often attracted to the vicinity of corn and grain fields. Each evening the cranes return to a few protected areas to roost together. In flight they often form in a "V", and at other times they will soar high on thermals in spiraling groups. In the summer, pairs claim territories in open, secluded grassy and marshy areas near water. The large nest is made of sticks, mud, moss and grass and placed on the ground near moist areas. The cranes eat a wide range of food, but in the winter primarily aquatic vegetation, seed and grain. In the summer the diet expands to include insects, small mammals, young birds and eggs. In migration these cranes learn to stop at the same historical migratory stop-over sites each year, and great concentrations can be seen at these sites for a few days each spring and fall. The four-digit banding code is SACR.

Aerial
Aerial

Mudflat
Mudflat

Agricultural
Agricultural

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

view small images | view large images | view zoomed images

CR_SACR_1A_O21106_S.jpg
Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

CR_SACR_1B_021106_S.jpg
Male
Honking (sound type)
Bird Song

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.