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Space Physiology

Extreme environments can be found on Earth, in space, and in the depths of the ocean. Dr. Biology and biologist, astronaut, and mountain climber Scott Parazynski sit down and talk about what life is like to explore these environments. Just what are they teaching us about our bodies and how might they hold up on long voyages in space?

 

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Topic Time
Introduction. 00:00
How does a biologist/physiologist become an astronaut? 01:29
KC-135 "vomit comet". 02:02
Vomit comet vs. weightlessness in space. 02:29
Parabolas and zero gravity. 03:00
How long do the parabolas last? 03:15
What is it like to be in space? 03:50
Does lack of gravity ever get tiring? 04:46
Space walks. 05:18
Twins experiment by NASA. 06:03
What kind of tests will they use? 07:19
What differences did you notice in your body in space vs. on Earth? 08:27
What are the biggest challenges for humans who travel to Mars? 09:58
Do we need to learn about microbes in space? 11:35
Exercise equipment in space. 12:45
Sleep in space. 15:00
Should we go to Mars? 16:18
Mars trip will help us learn about the human body. 18:30
How many mountains have you climbed? 19:05
Climbing Everest or going into space? 19:31
Does space have any similarities to climbing mountains? 20:16
Is Mount Everest the tallest mountain? 21:26
Have you thought about exploring the Mariana Trench? 22:30
Exploring the ocean deep. 22:58
What keeps us from more deep ocean exploration? 23:12
Pressure differences. 23:41
Three questions. 24:41
When did you first know you wanted to be a biologist or astronaut? 24:51
Did you have detours in your progress? 25:27
If we took away science and exploration, what would you be? 26:23
What advice do you have for young biologists or astronauts? 27:32
Do you think there is life on other planets? 29:02
Sign-off 30:30

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Space Physiology

Video editor: CJ Kazilek

Planet Mars

A trip to the planet Mars could be the ultimate extreme journey for the human body. The Spaced Out Physiology story can shed some more light on the topic. Image by the Hubble Heritage Team.

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Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

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Planet Mars

A trip to the planet Mars could be the ultimate extreme journey for the human body. The Spaced Out Physiology story can shed some more light on the topic. Image by the Hubble Heritage Team.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.