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Mama Ji's Molecular Kitchen

By Guruatma "Ji" Khalsa

Welcome to Mama Ji's Molecular Kitchen!

There are lots of sites out there full of molecular techniques and protocols, but very little information (either online or in readable hardcopy form) that explain how and why these techniques work. That's where this site comes in.

I've written in simple terms about a number of commonly used molecular techniques, explaining what they are and how they work. So bookmark this site and read it the next time a professor or colleague describes something in technical jargon you can't understand, or when a high-profile court trial makes molecular sciences an interest to the general public.

 

Prep & Purification

Electro-
phoresis

Visualization, Detection & Quantitation

Recombination

Characterization

DNA Techniques

Alkaline Lysis

SDS-Page

Agarose Gel

PCR

Southern Blot

Restriction Enzymes

Plasmids

Sequencing

RNA Techniques

   

Northern Blot

RT-PCR

   

Protein Techniques

Chromatography

 

Western Blot

Radio-Immune Precipitation

   

Use the chart above to find a subject and click away. If you have any suggestions for improvements or would like to see a technique added, please use the Feedback form on Ask A Biologist.


About the author: Guruatma "Ji" Khalsa created this cookbook as part of her M.N.S. degree at Arizona State University. It has been used by thousands of people around the world and has become one of the popular areas to visit on the Ask A Biologist website.

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.