School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bugs in Films

This is not a Hollywood story. The films we are talking about are not what you want to have in your body because they can make a great home for bad microscopic organisms. Dr. Biology finds out about biofilms from Valerie Stout, Associate Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 9MB

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Topic Time
Bacteria, not all are bad. 00:45
How much bacteria is in the body? 01:32
Where do we find bacteria? 01:48
What other things are microbes besides bacteria? Viruses etc.. 02:52
Microbes comes from the Greek word "Mikros" meaning small. How much of the Earth's biomass is made up of microbes? 03:22
How many of the microbe species are there? 04:02
Biofilms 04:28
What do biofilms do? 05:42
Biofiilms and antibiotics. 06:34
Biofilms, your teeth and brushing your teeth. 07:45
E. coli - Esherisha coli 09:29
Viruses and what's is living and what's not living? 12:09
When did you first know that you wanted to be a biologist or scientist? 14:20
What would you be and do if you were not a biologist? 15:10
What advice do you have for young scientists? 16:09

back to top

Bugs in Films

Audio editor: Charles Kazilek

Intraorally developed biofilm

Visit our story on Valerie Stout and her research on biofilms to learn more. Image by Ronald Ordinola Zapata.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Intraorally developed biofilm

Visit our story on Valerie Stout and her research on biofilms to learn more. Image by Ronald Ordinola Zapata.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.