School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Cataglyphis Versus Saharabot

An interview with myrmecologist RĂ¼diger Wehner from University of Zurich. Listen in as Dr. Biology learns how these desert animals are revealing their success in the Sahara Desert.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 15MB

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Topic Time
Intro - 00:00
What's the name of your ant? 01:25
How hot a temperature can this ant live? 01:53
Why they have long legs. 02:39
How do most ants navigate? [pheramones] 03:31
How does Cataglyphis navigate? 03:57
Path integration 04:45
A built in compass for direction and odometer for distance. 05:08
What is their built in compass? 05:18
Polarized light and ant contact lenses. 05:42
How do you put contact lenses on an ant? 07:07
How do your ants tell distance (odometer)? 08:19
Ants on stilts. 09:06
Math in sceince. 11:31
Trips paths to and from their nest - ant geometry. 12:07
Ant Geometry. 14:00
Mini brains, mega tasks, and smart solutions. 14:30
Maps and navigation and landmarks. 14:43
Integration - compass, odometer, landmarks. What is the most important? 15:57
Ant photographic memory. 18:04
Saharabot the desert ant robot. 20:24
Cataglyphis ant has 360 degree vision. eyes in the back of their head? 21:53
When did you know when you first knew you wanted to be a scientist? 25:00
What would you be if you were not a scientist/biologist. 26:54
What advice would you have for someone wanting to become a biologist? 27:43
What's it like doing research in the Sahara Desert? 29:55
Sign-off 31:07

back to top

Cataglyphis Versus Saharabot

Video editor: Charles Kazilek

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.