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Why is Rudolp's nose red?

The Other Marine Biologist

An interview with limnologist Jim Elser from the School of Life Sciences. Listen in as Dr. Biology and co-host Michael Saxon learn about a biologist that studies life in and around fresh water, or you might think of him as the other marine biologist.

Content Info | Transcript


MP3 download | 15MB

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Topic Time
Intro - 00:00
How does climate affect how animals adapt and evolve? [Michael] 02:09
How fast are you talking about the temperature changing? [Michael] 03:46
How does evolution occur in the first place? [Michael] 04:42
 - Charles Darwin & evolution occurs when there are three conditions 04:52
So if it is better for an animal to run faster that would only fast ones survive? [Dr. Biology] 06:05
If climate change comes too quickly will there be a problem. [Dr. Biology] 07:57
Are birds dinosaurs? [Michael] 08:57
 - Archaeopteryx [feather toothed dinosaur] 10:14
What do you do as a limnologist? [Dr. Biology] - food webs 11:08
Daphnia - what is it and what it looks like? [Michael, Elser, Dr. Biology] 12:04
Algae - growing algae 13:20
How many living things are in a drop of pond water?  [Dr. Biology] 14:00
Evolutionary ecology- what is it? [Dr. Biology] 15:21
What is stoichiometry? [Michael] 16:45
Where in the world has your research taken you? [Dr. Biology] 18:23
 - Lake Vostok in Antarctica 20:11
 - Don Juan Pond - never freezes. 21:33
evoSpore - what is it? [Michael] 22:49
When did you first know you wanted to be a limnologist? [Michael] 25:54
If you weren't a limnologist what would you be? [Michael] 27:12
What advice do you have for someone wanting to be biologist or limnologist? [Dr. Biology] 28:05
Sign-off 29:30
Podcast Contest Information 31:03

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The Other Marine Biologist

Audio editor: Charles Kazilek

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.