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Bird Details

Owls Owls

Great Horned Owl

Bubo virginianus

Great Horned Owl
copyright Robert Shantz
Length: 22 in. (56 cm)
Occurring from northern Alaska to Argentina, this huge owl also occupies a wide range of habitats from tundra to subtropical forests. It hunts only at night and relishes mammals, such as skunks, rabbits and squirrels, but it will also eat large birds, fish, frogs, reptiles and scorpions. During the day, it roosts high in a tree and is often quite obvious. This owl nests in abandoned hawk, crow, and raven nests, but it will also use large tree cavities, crevices in cliff faces or almost any other protected site. It frequently enters suburban areas and even well vegetated cities. The four-digit banding code is GHOW.

Desert
Desert

Fir forest
Fir forest

Oak-pine woodland
Oak-pine woodland

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Urban city
Urban city

Agricultural
Agricultural

Savanna
Savanna

Mesquite bosque
Mesquite bosque

Cliffs / boulders
Cliffs / boulders

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Male
Hooting (sound type)
Bird Call
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Male
Hooting (sound type)
Bird Call
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CR_GHOW_1B_050202_S.jpg
Male
Hooting (sound type)
Bird Call

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CR_GHOW_2_102503_S.jpg
Male
Hooting (sound type)
Bird Call

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Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.