School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bird Details

Perching Perching

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Common Yellowthroat
copyright Herbert Clarke
Length: 5 in. (13 cm)
This skulking warbler is restricted to dense vegetation along water courses, and its song and calls are the easiest way to detect its presence. It feeds mainly on insects and spiders caught on vegetation near the ground. Its cup-shaped nest is placed low in a bush and is large and loosely constructed of stems and grass. The four-digit banding code is COYE.
common_yellowthroat.jpg

Male
copyright Herbert Clarke

Riparian / River forest
Riparian / River forest

Marsh / swamp
Marsh / swamp

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
Download sound

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call
Download sound

view small images | view large images | view zoomed images

CR_COYE_5_040602_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

CR_COYE_6_042702_S.jpg
Male
Buzzing (sound type)
Bird Call

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.