School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow upshow/hide menu

Why is Rudolp's nose red?

Bird Details

Perching Perching

Cordilleran Flycatcher

Empidonax occidentalis

Cordilleran Flycatcher
copyright Herbert Clarke
Length: 6 in. (14 cm)
An inconspicuous but common bird in the mountain forests of the interior west, the Cordilleran Flycatcher sits on low to mid level branches waiting for an insect to fly by. It then flies out to catch the insect in the air or sometimes from a nearby leaf. Its nest of moss, lichens and leaves is usually placed far back in the recess of a ledge or tangle of vegetation, but rarely it will be in a tree cavity. The four-digit banding code is COFL.
cordilleran_flycatcher.jpg

Male
copyright Herbert Clarke

Fir forest
Fir forest

Oak-pine woodland
Oak-pine woodland

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Song
Download sound

view small images | view large images | view zoomed images

CR_COFL_2_061604_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Song

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

CR_COFL_051103_S.jpg
Male
Chirping (sound type)
Bird Song

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

 

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.

dropdown arrow downdropdown arrow up  Learn More

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.