Scurvy in sailors

Thiamin

What it does:

  • helps convert the food we eat to the energy we need

Foods that have thiamin:

  • spinach, tomato juice, watermelon, sunflower seeds, ham

Deficiency problems:

  • weakness, tingling in feet and hands, poor coordination
Thiamin

Riboflavin - named for its yellow color (flavus means yellow in Latin)

What it does:

  • helps convert the food we eat to the energy we need

Foods that have riboflavin:

  • milk, cheese, liver, broccoli, asparagus, spinach

Deficiency problems:

  • eye disorders, cracks at corners of mouth, swollen tongue
riboflavin

Niacin

What it does:

  • helps our body use the fat and sugar we eat for energy
  • helps keep our skin healthy

Foods that have niacin:

  • mushrooms, tuna, green beans, broccoli, spinach, breakfast cereals

Deficiency problems:

  • diarrhea, skin problems, mental disorientation
niacin

Vitamin B6

What it does:

  • helps make red blood cells
  • helps our body use the fat and protein we eat for energy

Foods that have vitamin B6:

  • spinach, broccoli, tomato juice, banana, watermelon, chicken breast

Deficiency problems:

  • headache, convulsions, vomiting, flaky skin, sore tongue
b6

Folate

What it does:

  • helps to make new cells
  • helps prevent heart disease

Foods that have folate:

  • asparagus, broccoli, corn flakes, green beans, tomato juice, beans

Deficiency problems:

  • diarrhea, mental disorders, poor growth
folate

Vitamin B12

What it does:

  • helps to make new cells

Foods that have vitamin B12:

  • meat, fish, poultry, milk, cheese, eggs

Deficiency problems:

  • anemia, poor nerve function
b12

Biotin

What it does:

  • helps you get energy from carbohydrate foods
  • helps break down and use nutrients from food

Foods that have biotin:

  • most fresh vegetables, egg yolk, cereals, some breads

Deficiency problems:

  • tiredness, low appetite, anemia, vomiting, depression
folate 

Pantothenic acid

What it does:

  • helps you get energy from foods
  • helps break down and use nutrients from food

Foods that have pantothenic acid:

  • whole grains, legumes, egg yolk, some meats, some vegetables

Deficiency problems:

  • rare but may include tiredness, anemia, vomiting, depression
niacin 

Vitamin C- almost all animals make vitamin C in their bodies (only humans, guinea pigs, some bats, and some fish don't)

What it does:

  • protects cells from damage
  • helps keep bones and skin healthy
  • may help prevent cancer and heart disease

Foods that have vitamin C:

  • oranges, strawberries, peppers, kiwi, brussel sprouts, broccoli, spinach

Deficiency problems:

  • bleeding gums, tiredness, weakness, sore muscles
vitamin c

View Citation

You may need to edit author's name to meet the style formats, which are in most cases "Last name, First name."

Bibliographic details:

  • Article: Water Soluble Vitamins
  • Author(s): Dr. Biology
  • Publisher: Arizona State University School of Life Sciences Ask A Biologist
  • Site name: ASU - Ask A Biologist
  • Date published: October 8, 2009
  • Date accessed: October 23, 2018
  • Link: https://askabiologist.asu.edu/content/water-soluble-vitamins

APA Style

Dr. Biology. (2009, October 08). Water Soluble Vitamins. ASU - Ask A Biologist. Retrieved October 23, 2018 from https://askabiologist.asu.edu/content/water-soluble-vitamins

American Psychological Association. For more info, see http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/

Chicago Manual of Style

Dr. Biology. "Water Soluble Vitamins". ASU - Ask A Biologist. 08 October, 2009. https://askabiologist.asu.edu/content/water-soluble-vitamins

MLA 2017 Style

Dr. Biology. "Water Soluble Vitamins". ASU - Ask A Biologist. 08 Oct 2009. ASU - Ask A Biologist, Web. 23 Oct 2018. https://askabiologist.asu.edu/content/water-soluble-vitamins

Modern Language Association, 7th Ed. For more info, see http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/
A swallowtail caterpillar
Is there anything in nature that get smaller as it thrives?

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