School of Life Sciences | Ask A Biologist

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Frenzied Fluids

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  • Astronaut: a man or woman whose job it is to fly in space. Astronauts are usually really good at math and science, and aren't scared of sitting on top of rockets.
  • Glamorous: something exciting and attractive.
  • Gravity: the attraction of one body to another. Gravity gives objects weight and causes them to fall to the ground if dropped... more
  • Lymph: a fluid that circulates through your body, helping to fight infections.

Frenzied Fluids

Space may sound glamorous, but living in space changes the way you look, and in space you should never stray too far from a bathroom. Gravity affects water and lymph, fluids found in our bodies. Lymph helps our bodies fight against sicknesses like the cold or flu and other infections.

Fluid movement in body

On Earth, fluids are being pulled down by gravity, and our muscle movement helps to move them back up. In space, because body fluids aren’t pulled down by gravity, they collect around the chest and head.

The upper body swells, and astronauts get what’s called “puffy face.” Because fluids don’t move around the body as well as when on Earth, these pools of fluid fool the body, making it think it is carrying too much water. This makes the astronauts have to pee a lot. In space, astronauts pee more and drink less, so they can become dehydrated very easily.

Astronauts drinking

In space, it is easy to become dehydrated. Here astronauts show off special drink containers.

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Astronauts drinking

In space, it is easy to become dehydrated. Here astronauts show off special drink containers.

Share to Google Classroom

Be part of Ask A Biologist

by volunteering, or simply sending us feedback on the site. Scientists, teachers, writers, illustrators, and translators are all important to the program. If you are interested in helping with the website we have a Volunteer page to get the process started.