Biology Stories

Explore the world of biology and meet some of our biologists. Here you can learn about the living world and find out what is so cool about biology that someone would do it for a living. Pick a story to read or listen to one of our podcast shows filled with guest scientists who share their experiences and passion for discovery.

Within Arizona, several cities now release wastewater into riverbeds, essentially creating "new" rivers. Is wastewater different from water found in naturally occurring rivers, such as the Verde River?

Travel to Northern Arizona to the research site of ecologist Stan Feath and learn what he has learned from two native grasses. Who would have thought so much could be learned from these simple plants and the microscopic ecosystem that is part of their success. We also learn how Sleepy Grass got its nickname and the secret of why a fungus found in grasses could end up helping humans.

Understanding evolution doesn't just help us figure out how humans evolved...it also helps us understand why we have the health problems we do in today's society. Evolutionary medicine can help us understand our health, why we get sick, and how we can better prevent and treat disease.
Also in: Español

What life lies below the surface of the water? A question that marine biologist Susanne Neuer has been studying since her childhood days. Now it is a career that she loves.

We hear about biologists studying everything from tiny organisms to whole ecosystems. But how can the role of a biologist be so broad? Let's take a closer look at what biologists do and how you can become a biologist.

You may have heard that the instructions for life are within your DNA and the DNA of any living thing. But how does DNA relate to a genome?

GMO might sound like a hard-to-understand name. But taking a quick look into the world of genetic modification will hopefully make it all a bit easier to understand.

An interview with biologist Gro Amdam, one of the members of the group that brought us the bee genome. Hey just what is a genome and could bees hold the answer to aging? In this show we learn the answers to these questions and why researchers are buzzing around bees.

People like different types of music, but can the type of music you like be controlled by your style of thinking?

Animals that are moved around by the activity of people can affect the places they end up. This article discusses the effects one particular fish has on the river ecosystems where it is introduced.

What happens when good cells go bad? In this program Dr. Biology talks with cell biologist Michael Berens about cells and why they sometimes go bad. Could it be the genes and if it is a genetic breakdown could the new world of translational genomics hold the key to new treatments?

Bonobos and chimpanzees look a lot alike and they use similar gestures or movements to communicate. But do the same gestures always mean the same thing?

People always seem to get the flu more often during the colder months. Scientists set out to investigate why the flu virus is more common when it's cold outside. 

Insects are found in both rural and urban environments, but do they have a preference? Scientists are studying how urban environments affect an insect's chances of survival. 

Where in the world is Kazakhstan (Ka-zakh-ston)? This may be a puzzling question to some, but no longer. This story we will help put the pieces together.

Do we really need to sleep? What about other animals? Scientists examine whether sleep is really necessary, and what happens when animals do sleep.

Imagine you are on a sailing ship in 1747. You left England only a couple of months ago and you felt fine. Now you are so tired you can barely walk. Dr. Lind wants to discover what is causing you so much pain that you can't work.

Ever wonder how our arms and legs know how fast and how long to grow? So have scientists.

When we start talking about turtles crossing roads, you may think it's a joke. But crossing roads and highways is serious business for reptiles and many other animals. Is there any way to keep them safe?

Head injury in humans and other animals are bad news. So how is it that woodpeckers can peck wood all day without injuring their brains?

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